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Spray Foam Insulation

Allergic Reaction To Insulation? Here's What You Need To Know...

allergic-reaction-to-insulation

Having hayfever can be awful – streaming eyes, runny nose and frequent coughing, sneezing and spluttering don’t make for fantastic sociable traits. However, your hayfever should ease off once you’re safely ensconced indoors in your house.

If it doesn’t, or if it even worsens when you’re indoors, you may not have hayfever. You may actually be experiencing an allergic reaction to insulation; and if so, it’s important to fix it as soon as possible.

Here’s some common allergic reactions to insulation among homeowners, and some top tips to solve each one in turn…

Allergic Reaction to Insulation #1: Sore Eyes

Sore, red or streaming eyes can be caused by a range of short-term viruses and infections, but once treated, should clear up within a matter of days. If your irritated eyes continue to be sore when you’re indoors, it’s likely that you’re experiencing an allergic reaction to something in the home.

This is commonly insulation, whereby tiny particles of fibreglass insulation break off and become airborne, scratching against the eyes, and causing real discomfort. Some types of insulation can cause eye and sight issues due to ‘off-gassing’ allergens within their chemical make-up, which can be trickier to spot.

You won’t be able to see either of these irritants (yes, even if your eyes are fine!), but both can cause ongoing discomfort and, in extreme cases, even blindness.

Allergic Reaction to Insulation #2: Respiratory Problems

Respiratory issues, such as problems with breathing, frequent coughing or sneezing or chest pain, can be irritated by insulation breaking down. This is an issue with fibreglass insulation, and can have extremely dangerous results.

As fibreglass insulation ages, its strands can come apart, and become airborne. These are easily inhaled, and can have devastating consequences when they enter the body – the strands are, after all, made of glass.

The glass causes scratches and cuts on surfaces it touches, and should it enter the lungs, can become extremely problematic, resulting in severe respiratory conditions and illness, and, in some cases, even requiring surgical intervention to remove it.

Allergic Reaction to Insulation #3: Hives and Rashes

When handling fibreglass or chemical insulation, it is important to look after not just your respiratory health, but also your skin.

If thick industrial gloves are not used, the material can cut, graze and spur rashes on the skin similar to hives and other allergic reactions.

Rashes may be easily treated with anti-inflammatories, but where the skin has broken, it is important to keep it clean and well maintained, to ward off potential infection.

allergic-reaction-to-insulation

Spray foam insulation does not break down over time, and, therefore, does not disintegrate. The chemical make-up of the material also means that it will not become a food-stuff for unwanted pests and it’s water-tightness ensures it will not transport damp into the home and will not grow mould

How to Avoid having an Allergic Reaction to Insulation

The latest innovation in insulation is a hypo-allergenic product that’s a chemical foam. Spray foam insulation is a water-blown foam, that expands to fill the space around it, before drying out to seal it off.

It creates an air-tight and water-tight seal around the property it protects, keeping it warm, dry and comfortable.

Spray foam is a chemical mixture that’s blended in equal parts with water. The chemical portion of the mixture is made up of several non-harmful chemicals, with a trace of formaldehyde.

Even during the drying (or curing) process, which can take up to 24-hours from the initial spray, third-party laboratory tests show that any traces of residual ‘off-gassing’ of these chemicals are well within the safe levels for inhalation.

Spray foam insulation does not break down over time, and, therefore, does not disintegrate. The chemical make-up of the material also means that it will not become a food-stuff for unwanted pests and it’s water-tightness ensures it will not transport damp into the home and will not grow mould.

This multi-purpose product is safe to touch and be around, and need not even be covered unless desired. Bright white in colour, and with the consistency of sponge cake, Icynene spray foam insulation can be left exposed safely, and can even brighten spaces, such as lofts.

Spray foam insulation should only be installed by fully British Board of Agrement certified technicians, with the relevant experience and safety qualifications. Our talented team of expert installers can offer this alongside workmanship that is second to none. Just look at the reviews written on TrustPilot:

“The fitter was only happy if I was, and hard work was the name of his game. Not only was he intelligent, caring and thoroughly professional, he was capable, resourceful and patiently willing to explain each step.”

“The two gentlemen who installed the Icynene worked hard and left the place clean and tidy. The aftercare has been excellent even to keeping their promise to come back and look at the completed job.”

“We found the two men that carried out the work in the loft efficient, clean and tidy. They made sure that dust sheets were fitted all the way along the landing area, and staircase. They were very pleasant and arrived on time.”

If you’d like to enquire about installation in your home, contact our friendly team today, by calling 0800 1700 636, or by simply clicking the button below!