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Driveways & Resin Surfacing

How To Resolve Resin Bonded Gravel Problems

Resin Bonded Gravel Problems How To Resolve

Resin surfaced driveways, pathways and outdoor patios are growing in popularity, as homeowners and those working in the property sector recognise and acknowledge the numerous benefits they have over more traditional solutions.

However, many opt for a cheaper option, and then later realise the benefits are not as expected.

What are the most common resin bonded gravel problems, and how can they be overcome? We explain all in the following article…

Resin Bonded Gravel Problems: The Basics

The confusion between resin surface driveway products is easily understood when you realise how similar the product type names are: resin bonded and resin bound.

Whilst only a few letters apart, the product differences are substantial; there are definitely not two interchangeable surfaces.

There are many resin bonded gravel problems that can occur which don’t happen with resin bound surfaces – and it’s all down to some fundamental differences in how they’re installed.

Resin Bonded Gravel vs. Resin Bound Gravel: Installation

Both resin bonded and resin bound gravel are made up of pieces of stone, recycled glass and other natural aggregate. Both are laid onto a solid and even surface to make up a new driveway, but the installation is approached in a number of different ways.

Resin bonded gravel takes the materials, and sprinkles or sprays them over a layer of resin, which is spread across the surface below. The material sticks to the resin on the bottom and then dries out. Once cured and thoroughly dried, any excess stones are swept away. This results in a rough and textured driveway.

Resin bound gravel however, coats the material entirely on all sides with the resin, and then pours it onto the surface. This gravel also dries out to solidify, but can take a little longer than single-side bonding. The result is a smooth to touch driveway layer, with no lumps, bumps or sharp edges.

Resin Bonded Gravel vs. Resin Bound Gravel: Loose Stones

The key here is the coating of all sides of the material, compared to coating just one. Bounding entirely in resin give greater adhesive properties, and no opportunity for stones to be knocked, broken or dislodged.

Unlike a resin bonded driveway, a resin bound  driveway offers a smooth surface that’s able to resist cracks, scuffs and damage.

Resin bonding also requires a more labour-intensive maintenance routine, with regular stone ‘top-ups’ to replace lost or loose materials. In contrast, resin bound driveways require nothing more than a power wash from time to time, to keep them looking as good as new.

Resin Bonded Gravel Problems How To Resolve

If you live in an area where rainfall is heavy or prolonged, or your driveway is particularly even and straight on the ground (and therefore likely to flood), extra drainage should be installed in the event of opting for resin bonded gravel

Resin Bonded Gravel vs. Resin Bound Gravel: Drainage

In line with Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDs) standards, resin bound driveways allow moisture to soak through them, and drain away naturally; leaving no standing water behind, and not re-routing excess water elsewhere into the garden or drive.

The pores within the material allow moisture to pass through it slowly, which eliminates puddles and standing water.

Resin bonded gravel is not permeable or porous. This unfortunately can result in standing water and flooding during periods of heavy rainfall, or can encourage water to run off of it, and flood or bog down the area surrounding the driveway.

If you live in an area where rainfall is heavy or prolonged, or your driveway is particularly even and straight on the ground (and therefore likely to flood), extra drainage should be installed in the event of opting for resin bonded gravel.

Resin Bonded Gravel vs. Resin Bound Gravel: Cleaning

The smooth surface of resin bound gravel makes it essentially wipe-clean, ensuring it retains its attractive aesthetics, despite the onslaught of the elements.

Resin bonded gravel, on the other hand, has lots of nooks and crannies within which grime, dirt and oil can stick, so needs pressure washing (if proper drainage is in place!), or individual scrubbing to wash away any unwanted marks.

Resin Bonded Gravel vs. Resin Bound Gravel: Installers

Anyone with access to the appropriate materials and equipment can lay resin bonded or resin bound driveways, but it’s a job that can be tricky, and ideally should never be approached as a D.I.Y attempt.

When hiring a specialist driveway technician, it’s likely that they will recommend resin bound surfaces over resin bonded.

Although it won’t result in ongoing maintenance work for them, a trustworthy installer will advise installation of a product that will be long-lasting and easy to maintain: and there’s no doubt this is resin bound surfaces rather than resin bonded.

When looking for a technician team to install your resin bound driveway, ensure they are fully accredited by the BBA. If you’d like a second opinion on products or services, browse independent reviews on TrustPilot.

Resolve resin bonded gravel problems the easy way, by opting for resin bound surfacing instead. Take the first step to refurbishing your driveway today, by calling 0800 1700 636, or simply clicking the button below!