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WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL WITH...A Self Watering Herb Garden?

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Have you always wanted to grow your own herbs but just don’t think you’ve got what it takes to look after your garden? A self-watering herb garden could be the perfect solution. 

Ideal for anyone who forgets to water their plants or who spends a lot of time away from home, this innovation lets anyone enjoy the benefits of their own freshly grown herbs... 

Why Grow Your Own?

There’s a whole lot of reasons why you should think about creating a self-watering herb garden. Firstly, of course, there’s the sense of satisfaction that comes with having managed to cultivate something edible all on your own. 

But there’s more to it than that. Fresh herbs have a host of benefits for your well-being and health that you shouldn’t miss out on.

Herbs are packed with antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. That makes them a great addition to your diet. A simple way to add flavour to every meal, they’re the tasty way to get a boost to your immune system. 

As an added advantage, you’ll save money when compared to the cost of buying packaged herbs from the supermarket and you’ll even reduce your carbon footprint by no longer needing products wrapped in plastic packaging and by reducing the amount of water you use. 

If you’re looking for low maintenance plants that anyone can grow, a self-watering herb garden is perfect for you.

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When you’re growing your herbs in a south-facing conservatory, for example, you will need to water them more frequently than if they are grown in a less sunny and warm environment

How do Self-Watering Pots Work?

Self-watering pots are fairly simple to understand. Instead of evaporating, the water coming from the plant’s runoff will be stored then re-absorbed into the soil. 

There are only two things required for a self-watering pot to function – a wick and a water reservoir.

The reservoir in the base of the pot will collect the water following every watering. The water which has been reserved will then be absorbed gradually back into the plant’s soil through the wick. You simply place the water into the reservoir, allowing it to act as a conduit so water can travel to the soil from the reservoir.

What do I Need to Make a Self-Watering Herb Garden?    

You only require a few pieces of equipment to get a self-watering herb garden up and running:

  • A deep, large bowl or bucket (make sure there isn’t any drainage in its base)
  • Large stones or rocks
  • A small plant pot made from plastic. Poke holes around its circumference
  • A piece of loosely woven hessian or fabric
  • Soil
  • Herbs

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Your herbs will need different amounts of water depending on their positioning, whether they’re grown outdoors or indoors, the amount of sun exposure and the kind of herbs you’re growing

Step by Step Instructions

First, place the stones or rocks in an even layer across the base of your bowl or bucket. This is the area which will be the water reservoir. Form a well in the centre of the stones. Put the plant pot into the well, ensuring it touches the bottom. You should keep the pot’s top level with the stones. 

Place the fabric over the stones, pressing down its centre into the plant pot. Put soil into the well you’ve made in the plant pot. Flatten down the fabric over the stones, pressing it into the bowl or bucket’s edges so that none of the stones can be seen then begin to fill the bucket or bowl with soil.

Once the bucket is two thirds full, plant the herbs. Fill up with the remaining soil before gently patting down so the herbs are secure. 

Next, water the herbs. The water which runs off will be collected in the reservoir, soaking gradually into the fabric wick. This ensures the soil stays moist. Don’t overwater your herbs since the roots could rot. 

Your herbs will need different amounts of water depending on their positioning, whether they’re grown outdoors or indoors, the amount of sun exposure and the kind of herbs you’re growing. 

When you’re growing your herbs in a south-facing conservatory, for example, you will need to water them more frequently than if they are grown in a less sunny and warm environment.

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 A Low Maintenance Garden

Even if you’ve despaired of ever being able to grow your own herbs, a self-watering herb garden is within everyone’s reach. Even if you don’t have a garden, you can still grow your favourite herbs on your windowsill, or in your conservatory. 

Visit Home Logic to find out more about the other benefits a conservatory can bring you. Alternatively, simply click the button below to talk to our green-fingered experts today!