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Spray Foam Insulation

Where Not To Use Spray Foam Insulation

Where Not To Use Spray Foam Insulation expanding foam

Spray foam has been around for more than 30 years. In the past 10 years, spray foam insulation has been perfected. As such, it is available across the UK, at a very affordable price.

Spray foam goes from liquid, to foam form, in just a few seconds, making it a perfectly practical method for insulating your property’s interior.

Today, we will talk about spray foam insulation, and where to put it. Spray foam can tackle air leakages better than many other insulation options, and can easily fill up cavities and block any small holes.

You can apply spray foam to horizontal and vertical surfaces.

In addition to improving a home’s energy efficiency, spray foam is also an effective air barrier material as well.

The trick is to apply spray foam properly, in the correct amounts and places – something that should only be attempted by a licensed contractor.

Where Not To Use Spray Foam Insulation

The trick is to apply spray foam properly, in the correct amounts and places – something that should only be attempted by a licensed contractor

Benefits of Spray Foam Insulation

Before we get to the part where we explore the best places to insulate with spray foam, let’s take a look at all the benefits you get from this multi-purpose material:

  • Spray foam outperforms traditional insulation materials
  • Spray foam insulation will reduce your energy use by up to 50%
  • Prevents air leakage and infiltration, resulting in cool air inside
  • Prevents mould, allergens, pollen, dust, and mildew from entering your home
  • Reduces outdoor noise, resulting in a quiet home
  • Increases the resale value of your home
  • Creates a healthier, more comfortable environment
  • Reduces heating and cooling costs
  • Spray foam does not sag, shift, or degenerate over time

Where Not To Use Spray Foam Insulation

For example, ceiling cavities are the perfect place for open cell spray foam insulation. The R-Value is lower, going from 3.6 to 3.8 per inch

Open Cell vs. Closed Cell Spray Foam Insulation

There are two types of spray foam insulation, open-cell and closed-cell. Closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, making it the preferred type among industry specialists. You can sometimes find Ultimate spray foam, which is a combination of both types.

The R-value of closed cell spray foam is 6.0 per inch, with some stronger varieties being able to reach 7.00 per inch and higher. Because of this resistance, closed cell is much more favourable.

The increased density of this type of spray foam prevents mould growth, and allows for better temperature control. You can use it for building and appliances, but also to strengthen walls.

Open cell spray foam expands once applied, which allows you to install in areas, that are traditionally hard to reach.

For example, ceiling cavities are the perfect place for open cell spray foam insulation. The R-Value is lower, going from 3.6 to 3.8 per inch.

In extreme temperatures, open cell spray foam might not be enough. The big positive is the price, as open cell is much more affordable than closed cell spray foam.

Where To Use Spray Foam Insulation?

To understand where not to use spray foam insulation, we just need to take a look at the places where you can and should use. And that includes almost any part of your home. When properly installed, spray foam is the best air barrier. Here are some places where you should consider spray foam insulation:

  • The basement to seal pipes, plumbing, cracks, framing, and sills. You can use spray foam in the same spirit in the crawl space
  • Use spray foam for your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, to optimise the performance of the heating and cooling systems in your home. Use spray foam around the pipes, floor registers, and condensers
  • Exterior uses for spray foam include: electrical and gas penetrations, wall joints in the garage ceiling, around exterior faucets, stone wall repair, water feature fillers, the spot where siding and foundation meet, and many more
  • Use spray foam insulation around the windows to make sure you have a great air barrier

Where Not To Use Spray Foam Insulation

It is important to choose an installer with good reputation. You want someone that pays meticulous attention to detail, both before, during and after installation!

Why You Need to Hire a Professional

Spray foam insulation is best installed by a professional spray foam contractor, equipped with all the tools and experience to ensure an expert installation.

When it comes to spray foam insulation, experience matters. Spray foam has many advantages over other types of insulation. However, it isn’t failproof.

When components are mixed at the wrong temperature, or in the wrong ratio, spray foam can shrink away.

It is important to choose an installer with good reputation. You want someone that pays meticulous attention to detail, both before, during and after installation.

You deserve the best, and here at Home Logic, it’s our honour to provide it.

Spray Foam Challenges: How To Overcome Them

Applying spray foam insulation is not as simple as it sounds. That is one of the reasons why we recommend hiring a professional. Some of the challenges that might occur include:

  • Chemicals were not mixed properly, causing the foam to pull away from the surface
  • Chemicals were not mixed correctly, causing lingering odours and health problems
  • You rushed through the installation, leaving gaps and holes behind, that reduce the efficiency of spray foam
  • A vapour barrier was installed in cold climates, causing the roof to rot
  • The thickness was not specified
  • The local climate was not taken into consideration. As a result, the temperature and humidity were outside of the specifications made by the manufacturer

Installation is a key factor for insulation, which is why you need to hire someone who definitely knows what they’re doing! Simply call 0800 1700 636, or click the button below to get the ball rolling today!

Get instant price estimation on your specific insulation requirements here